Simulation Training in Virtual Reality

Recently I’ve been thinking a lot about how new technology will affect my life as an ED doctor. It’s 2018, and the un-ignorable hype surrounding #MedTech is reaching fever pitch. In my opinion, the big players are machine learning, telemedicine, and virtual reality (VR). Their impact promises to be unprecedented across the spectrum of medical environments, […]

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The role of research in emergency medicine training

Research matters to all of us training in Emergency Medicine. It must do: otherwise, the likes of St Emlyn’s, Life in the Fast Lane and The Bottom Line would not get millions of views every year from clinicians hungry to access the critical appraisal and practical recommendations that #FOAMed has become so adept at generating. […]

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How Theme Park, Space Invaders and Go have paved the way for exponential healthcare

I often imagine my retired self looking back at this point in my career, marvelling at how primitive it all was. By that stage, hospital fax machines, handwritten patient notes, stethoscopes, ‘bleeps’ and other relics of a time-gone-by will be collecting dust in the Ancient Medical History Museum. I’ll be a regular visitor at the […]

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Say Never!

  In my last blog I wrote about retained guidewires and why they are important to those of us in the Emergency Department. There were some tips on how to prevent retained guidewires through observership, redundancy, and good clear verbal and written documentation to promote absolute certainty that the guidewire has been removed. I also […]

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The Ugly Side of Exercise #RSMFrontline

Last week I attended ‘Frontline resuscitation’, a one-day conference hosted on by the Military Medicine Section of the Royal Society of Medicine (#RSMFrontline). Its aim was to ‘showcase cutting edge developments in resuscitation medicine and provide understanding of how these can be translated to military medicine’. I was one several civilian attendees keen to benefit from some […]

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Safety Newsflash! Retained Guidewires.

  If you’re a member of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine in the UK, you may have noticed an email pop up in your inbox recently, a safety newsflash on retained guidewires. RCEM put these out every few months, containing helpful and brief information in the crusade against events that should never happen, as […]

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Primary Survey August 2017.

Clinical pharmacists improve practice in emergency departments There are 2 studies in this month’s issue which show the benefits of clinical pharmacy input in the setting of an emergency department (ED). One from Spain and one from Belgium. It is a relatively high risk area for drug medication errors as there is a fast turnover […]

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Olympians and Comedians #PerformanceLDN

Traditionally, human factors and performance psychology are low down the priority list (or non-existent) in medical training. Students graduate from medical school with ‘academic-style’ mindsets, arguably ill-prepared for the practical, performance-dependent branches of medicine. In short, our training predisposes us to the yips. But change is afoot. On 24th June, I attended the London Performance Psychology Symposium at the Blizard Institute, close to the […]

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